Beautiful Mother’s Day Gifts From Uncommon Goods

The Uncommon Goods Mother's Day collection has some really nice picks for the mom in your life. :: www.nurturedmama.net

This week I’m teaming up with Uncommon Goods to share with you some fun Mother’s Day gift ideas.

I picked Uncommon Goods as a partner because I appreciate they way they do business. They feature unusual and often handmade products – over half of what they sell is handmade – and share stories of their designers and makers in both their catalogs and on their blog. I love seeing the real people who are making the things I’m buying and I always love a peek into a maker’s studio!

I also want to give them a high-five for their commitment to the environment and running a sustainable business. Uncommon Goods is a registered B-Corporation, which means they meet a stated and high standard on a range of progressive issues, including wage levels (their Brooklyn warehouse workers’ wages start at 50% higher than local minimum wage), environmental impact (a third of their products incorporate upcycled and recycled components) and giving back to the community (they donate $1 from each order to one of several non-profit organizations).

I also find their web site really easy to navigate and they have really well-curated gift collections.  You can see their Mother’s Day collection here and a wider collection of gifts for moms here.

The Uncommon Goods Mother's Day collection has some really nice picks for the mom in your life. :: www.nurturedmama.net

They sent me two products to try. The first of them is a Flavor Infuser Water Bottle (see it here). This glass water bottle has a BPA-free plastic insert that holds fruit or herbs and a sealing lid so you can fill it and carry it with you without worrying about leaking (always an issue with my metal Klean Kanteen bottle!). I was really excited about this bottle because I need to be drinking more water and I love infused water. Spring time is a great time to explore infused water flavors, as so many fruits and herbs are hitting the market and my garden right now. I’ve tried lemon-basil and lemon-mint water, and today I’m drinking lemon-strawberry (my lemon tree was very productive this winter!). For tomorrow morning, I’ve cut up some lime leftover from a margarita and part of a peach that wasn’t quite ripe enough for my daughter’s taste.

Since I’ve been using this bottle I’m definitely drinking more water. I’m also talking about drinking water with everyone, because when it is all filled with fruit it is beautiful and everyone who sees it asks me about it! It fits perfectly in the cup holder in my car and because it seals well I can tuck it into my purse when my hands are full. My only real concern with this bottle is that I’m going to drop it and break it. I love the idea of drinking out of a glass container, but I’m kind of a klutz.

You can find this glass bottle here and a similar non-glass bottle here.

The Uncommon Goods Mother's Day collection has some really nice picks for the mom in your life. :: www.nurturedmama.net

The second item I received is this lovely and delicate necklace (see it here). If you’ve been reading here long you’ve heard me talk about the mindfulness practice of being present in the moment, and this sweet little necklace is reminder of that practice for me. It is simple and understated – just my style. I love it. There are also matching earrings from the same artist (see them here). This set would be a lovely gift for a mama who needs a reminder to slow down and be present.

The Uncommon Goods Mother's Day collection has some really nice picks for the mom in your life. :: www.nurturedmama.net

Jewelry is a great Mom’s day gift all around, and there are several really lovely pieces in the Mother’s Day collection. I love the nesting birds design (here) and birth flower pendants (here). My favorite, though, is this modern locket design that can be customized with the birth stones of your children (see it here). So very sweet!

Maybe you are shopping for someone whose sensibilities are a little less delicate, though? Check out this hilarious and on-trend ampersand cheese and cracker board, and these salt rock tequila glasses. No matter who you are gifting, you are sure to find something wonderful for Mother’s Day with Uncommon Goods.

Which Uncommon Goods product would you most like to receive this Mother’s Day?

PS – if you want to support other businesses that support the same kinds of causes as Uncommon Goods, you can find a directory of other registered B-Corps here.

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20 Questions Every Woman Should Ask Herself

Do you want to know yourself better? Understand where you are in your life and where you would like to be going? These 20 questions will give you an excellent start on that path. :: www.nurturedmama.net

The title of this post is the same title as an article that was in Oprah magazine last spring. These are not the same questions that were in the article.

The article was really good, but I was most struck by the very first question they listed: “Do I Examine My Life Enough?

I’m a life-examiner. I journal. I’ve been seeing a therapist on a regular basis for many years. I talk through my experiences and reactions to things with my close friends. I write about my life here and elsewhere because it helps me to understand it.

I can easily say “Yes,” in answer to the first question in that article, but I have talked to many women who might answer “Maybe?” or “I don’t know how to do that,” or even, “Wow, that’s scary,” in response.

If you are one of those women, this list is for you. Here are 20 questions to ask yourself if you want to know yourself better. 20 questions to help you step back to examine your life and where you are in it. Don’t like the answers? Don’t have answers to some of them? That’s where your work lies.

I’m going to write more about each of these questions in the coming months, because they are big and juicy topics that I’d like to explore further. For now, pull out a journal and a piece of paper and see where your first answers to these questions takes you.

  1. What do I really want in this moment?
  2. How do I want to be loved?
  3. Who do I need to forgive?
  4. Am I in my body?
  5. Do I love myself exactly as I am right now?
  6. What can I let go of?
  7. What did I love to do when I was a child?
  8. What would I love to learn?
  9. What is my superpower?
  10. When was the last time I felt truly joyful?
  11. Who is my community?
  12. What is beautiful to me and do I have some of that in my life right now?
  13. Do I know the sound of my own true voice?
  14. What practice consistently brings me home to my self?
  15. What do I want my legacy to be?
  16. What have I done for myself today?
  17. What is my story?
  18. Have I planned for my own death, and my survivors?
  19. How can I speak with more love today?
  20. Can I ask a better question?

I’d love to hear from you. Which of these questions was most illuminating? Which made you most uncomfortable? Leave a comment below.

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How to Read All The Books You Want To

If you want to have more time to read, set a goal and make a few small adjustments. Now get to reading all those great books. :: www.nurturedmama.net

This year I have a goal to read 40 books. That feels a bit audacious, even though I know people who have a reading goal much higher even than that.

I started setting reading goals for myself a couple of years ago, when I realized I was hardly reading any more and I really really missed the act of really getting lost in a good book. I missed the intellectual workout. I missed the escape from my day to day life and the peek into lives far different than my own. I missed the practice of reading good writing and studying the craft of it, to make my own writing better. I just missed being a reader and I wanted to be a reader again.

Each year since then I’ve passed my goal, so I feel confident in sharing what I’ve learned about finding more time to read, so you, too, can read all the books you want to.

Make It Easy

To make your book the first thing you turn to, you have to make it really easy. Easier than picking up your phone and opening Facebook.

I love paper books. I really, really do. But I realized that if I wanted to read more, I was going to have to embrace other formats. I’ve tried eBooks on my iPhone (small, but very accessible) and my iPad (pretty good!). My partner uses a Kindle and he loves it.

I’ve also tried audio books, which I remember really enjoying when I had a long commute to work, but I can’t seem to make them work in my life right now. I know other moms who love audio books and listen to them while they walk or work around the house.

Experiment a bit to see what works for you. Even if all you do is start carrying a bigger bag so you can have your traditional book with you all the time, that’s great. Convenience is the key.

Find Gaps of Time

One of the great things about reading is that you can do it any time, anywhere (almost…). If you use an e-reader, you can even do it in the dark!

Once your reading material is convenient, you can fit it into pretty small gaps of time. While you are waiting in line at the carpool. While your kid is in a class (Does anyone else look forward to gym and ballet classes like I do?), or playing at the park. During the bedtime hour, if you keep your child company while they fall asleep.

You can listen to audio books while you cook dinner, while you drive, and while you exercise.

Small gaps add up – you might be surprise how quickly you can get through a book when you tuck it around all the edges of your life.

Give Something Up

If the gaps of time you’ve found aren’t enough, or you want the luxury of reading for longer stretches, you may need to give up something else to create those stretches. What do you spend time doing throughout your week? Try tracking your day in detail for a few days to see where your time goes. TV? Pinterest? Email? You may be surprised.

A number of years ago I turned off my cable account, which freed up a lot of time I was mindlessly spending in front of the TV watching shows I didn’t really care about. Check your time map against your priorities – are you putting your time on what you care about most? If not, make some adjustments.

Define And Track Your Reading Goal

The first year I decided to focus on reading as a priority, I set a goal of reading two books every month. That meant by the end of the year I would have read 24 books, which felt achievable, but still a challenge.

I tracked my progress by simply listing each title in an Evernote document as I finished it. I noticed that some months I’d finish only one book, and other months I’d read three or four. And I surprised myself by finishing the year with 26 books on my list.

I’ve long understood the value of setting a goal and writing it down. If you want to read more, say you are going to do it. Define what “more” means to you. Break it down – how many books each month or week to get to your goal? Then make it easy, find or free up some time, and begin. Keep track of your progress, pay attention to what’s working and what isn’t, and adjust as needed.

Be Willing To Quit A Book

One of the things I realized that first year is that when I’m reading something I’m not really enjoying, I read very slowly. And really, there are so many amazing books out there, do I want to waste my valuable time reading something I’m not enjoying? So I gave myself permission to quit a book.

That was easier said than done, because I felt bad – and still do! – doing it. Once I begin a book I feel committed. I’m not a quitter, really, anywhere in my life.

But really, there are places where being a quitter is a good thing, and we should all practice it a bit more. Reading a book you dislike is not a good use of your time. Put it down, start something else. The author will never know.

Do you have a reading goal this year? What’s the best book you’ve read recently? Share in the comments below!

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I Know A Mama

I know a mama who is all of us. :: www.nurturedmama.net

I know a mama who felt complete when she became a mother, even though she thought she felt complete before.

I know a mama who feels lost in her life at home with small children after she gave up her career to be there.

I know a mama who tries every day to be the kind of woman she hopes her daughter will grow up to be and every night that mama lays awake detailing all the ways she failed.

I know a mama who pays for childcare just to get some time alone.

I know a mama who can’t afford childcare, who is launching a small business while her children build Lego spaceships around her feet and watch more TV than she wants to admit.

I know a mama who thinks she’s too tired for sex every night, until he kisses her like that and changes her mind.

I know a mama who hasn’t had sex since before her toddler was born and is relieved that he’s stopped asking.

I know a mama who stands in the world a warrior, who is raising two wild boys with her heart wide open. Those boys will be lucky to find partners who will parent their own children that way, and those partners will be lucky to be loved by those boys who were taught to love with their hearts wide open.

I know a mama who has lost her boundaries and no longer knows how to tell her child, “No,” when he runs wild over her.

I know a mama whose children always play quietly and who taught them to read before they were three.

I know a mama who swallows tears every time she has to fill out a form that asks, “How many pregnancies? How many living children?”

I know a mama who has lost every pregnancy.

I know a mama whose babies were all birthed by other mothers.

I know a mama who considers getting pregnant again, but who has perfectly balanced pro and con lists and each day that passes past her fortieth birthday tips the list more toward con.

I know a mama who had her tubes tied after her third child so she would not be tempted to have more babies.

I know a mama who told me once, sitting in the sand at the park with her toddler, that having two kids is so much harder than she thought it would be, and she wishes she’d only had one.

I know a mama with Multiple Personality Disorder, another who is manic-depressive, and another who wonders, every morning when she takes the three black pills that keep her steady, how her depression is hurting her daughter.

I know a woman who loves her stretch marks because they remind her that she carried her babies inside her body and another who only undresses in the dark because she hates the marks and scars of childbearing so much.

I know a mama who once walked out of the bedroom, through the front door and straight into the street when she felt the urge to strike her child’s soft cheek rising like a tide in her chest.

I know a mama who left her sons with their father on Christmas Eve and never came back.

I know a mama who creeps into her child’s bedroom to stand in the dark and watch her sleep.

I know a mama who took her children and left the house with only the clothes on their backs because that home was no longer safe for them.

I know a mama who wakes in the night and considers dragging a blanket and pillow into her child’s room to sleep on the floor because across the hall feels intolerably far away.

I know a mama who schedules weekends away from her family a few times a year and doesn’t feel guilty about it at all.

I know a mama whose joy lifts at the sound of her man’s car pulling into the driveway.

I know a mama who lives for Monday morning, when her husband leaves the house.

I know a mama who lives for Monday morning, when she gets to leave the house and go back to the world of her professional life and away from the children she loves, but who make her feel out of control and bewildered.

Some of these mamas are me, and maybe some of them are you. These mamas are all of us. The potential for each of them is in each of us. Each of us experiences mothering in a way that is somehow simultaneously unique and universal.

What kind of mama are you?

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A Peek Into My Art Journal

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

I keep a little book in my purse at all times. It may be a stretch to call it an art journal, although it always has a little art in it. It is my catch-all, my notebook, my sketchbook, where I write down my to-do lists and phone numbers and dates before they get into my computer. More and more there is evidence of Bean in my books – her stickers, her lines, her drawings, sometimes the things she brings me to draw, if she catches me sketching.

These books are my grounding, my reminder that I am here, I am not lost, I have dreams and ideas and curiosities. Sitting down with my book and a pen or a brush is my easiest, most common form of self care. Here are some peeks inside those pages.

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

These next few pages come from a larger book I keep in my studio. It is messier, painty-er and where I experiment. In these pages I am finding my way back to myself as an artist.

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

A peek inside my art journals :: www.nurturedmama.net

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What Will I Remember?

What will I remember from these years, this moment? The hard or the beautiful? Will I remember it when I need it most? :: www.nurturedmama.net

I wonder what I’ll remember? Will it be simply that the Spring time change is something I loathe with a particular passion? Will I remember why?

Will I remember how she stuck her fingers in her ears and scowled at me from her car seat while we were driving home from the pleasant two hours at Hakone Gardens, a break from the otherwise angry day we had spent together so far? “I don’t want to hear this music. It hurts my ears.”

Will I remember how I said, “Suck it up, I’m tired of all the things you don’t like today,” and then turned the music up a little louder to drown my frustration?

Will I remember how I realized I didn’t really like that music either, but hell no I was not going to turn it off after putting my foot down about it and I made us both listen to the whole album?

Or will I remember the moment in her room that night, after I turned off the iPhone with the playlist she’d borrowed from her dad, which music that was decidedly not sleepy music and she screamed and kicked at me and I used that low voice I’ve only used a handful of times in my life and never to her to say, “Stay. In. Your. Bed.” and she recognized that voice even though she’d never heard it before and she did stay, and then asked for a tissue and wiped her eyes with exactly the same gesture I use when I’m sitting on my therapist’s saggy tan couch and I’m crying but I wish I wasn’t?

Will I remember how then she asked me to sing to her, and I leaned over the side of her bed to sing the song about a baby owlet, and she listened and sniffled, and then asked, “Why poor owlet?” and I sang the next line, “He is tired/from crying so,” and she said “Why is he crying?” and I remembered what I’d been forgetting all day, which is that she’s a sensitive girl, and she feels my tension and anger deeply. She doesn’t pout just to be mean to me. Maybe she didn’t like my music because she was mad, but maybe it really was hurting her ears. And I remembered how neither of us had slept enough for three nights running and both of us need a lot of sleep. And just as I felt like I would cry for being so mean and unfeeling to her, she did cry, big sobs that curled her small body up, and said, “I’m so sad, too.”

Will I remember how I said, “I love you,” and she said, “I know you love me even when you are mad. And I do, too. I love you when I’m mad. But it makes my stomach hurt a little,” and I knew exactly the feeling she was talking about because I’d been feeling it all day?

Will I remember how said she wanted it to be tomorrow, and I asked, because I know that feeling too, “Because you want this horrible day to be over?” and she said, “Yes.” She said, “I don’t want us to fight tomorrow.” Will I remember how much she needs to feel connected with me and how much it hurts us both when we are arguing?

Will I remember the way she climbed down out of her bed and tried snuggle into my lap, the way she used to fall sleep every night? She doesn’t really fit any more, but we made do. Her legs hang down almost to the floor, but her head still fits under my chin, her ear against my heart. She wrapped her arms around my arm, pulled my hand to her cheek. Will I remember that? “You’re the best, Mommy. I love you so so much.” Will I remember her easy forgiveness?

Will I remember, when we care barely recognize each other through a haze of her hormones, how much she is like me, and how that little girl still somewhere in her long teenage body just needs to know she is seen and heard and understood, and loved in spite of anything we might have said to each other? Will I remember to hold her and say I’m sorry, and I love you so, so much, and I love you even when we are mad at each other?

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What We Should Learn From The Dress Debate

 

Is the dress white or blue? Or maybe we could all agree that it is grey? What we should learn from the dress debate. :: www.nurturedmama.net

Photo by Hugo Kerr.

I have a secret indulgence: I like to lay in bed in the morning and read email and blog posts on my phone. So Friday morning, while indulging, I discovered that the internet had blown up overnight about a dress. Specifically, what color the dress was. Was it white or was it blue?

“Huh. Crazy internet,” I thought. “Clearly the dress is white.”

When I got up, I showed the photo to my man. “What color is this dress?” I asked.

“Its blue,” he said.

“That’s so weird,” I said. I read him the article I’d found about how the difference in perception was due to how our eyes receive color and how our brain analyses that information. And then we continued with our morning.

Later in the day, I scrolled through Facebook again and noticed that the debate was still raging, but what struck me most was how angry people were getting in defense of what color they believed the dress to be.

I saw people being dismissive of people who saw the dress in other colors than they did. I saw someone say it made her feel angry when someone told her they saw other colors than she did. Some thought it was a joke or a hoax, and others started to doubt their own eyesight.

The heat and volume of the discussion reminded me immediately of other topics that have recently been debated in the media (both social or traditional):

  • gay marriage
  • vaccinations
  • capitol punishment
  • The Affordable Care Act
  • whether “free speech” applies to religious satire or not
  • home birth vs. hospital birth
  • breastfeeding vs. formula feeding
  • Democratic vs. Republican ideology

Some of these positions are backed up by evidence, and then we argue about whether the evidence is valid or not.

Quickly, the arguments wind themselves into name calling and finger pointing and mean words. A few stand on the sidelines and wonder, “Can’t we all just get along?”

It appears we can’t.

“We live in polarizing times,” my man said, when I told him about my observation on the dress debate. It is as if we say, “If you aren’t with me, you’re against me,” instead of “We can’t agree on everything, so let’s have lunch.” Even our politicians are so dug in to their opposite positions that it is becoming hard to pass a law or a budget in our Senate or our House, either.

Is it because we are afraid to be wrong? Afraid of what it might mean to be wrong? Is it because we are afraid of what it might mean for other views we hold tightly if the other person is right?

Two articles published in last summer, one in the Atlantic, and one in The Washington Post, discuss the results of a Pew study that showed that political polarization in the US is rapidly increasing and becoming more and more deeply embedded in our society. In a nutshell, the study showed that higher education makes liberals more liberal and conservatives more conservative. We tend to marry and live near people who hold similar views to our own, and people with social and geographic mobility (which increases with higher education), tend to move to and live near other people who think like they do.

But the good news, The Atlantic article says, is that we have the ability to overcome our polarization. How do we do that?

What if we approached divisive topics with curiosity, rather than anger? What if we actively tried to put ourselves in the shoes of people on the other side of the argument? Wouldn’t that change the conversation entirely?

Instead of It’s blue and brown. Period. Next?  ask, “I wonder why we each see different colors? What would cause that?”

Instead of dismissing the opinion of someone who votes a different party line, ask, “What top three issues would you like your elected representative to vote on, and why?”

Instead of spouting an opinion over where birth should happen and how, ask, “What was the most magical part of your birth experience?”

Wouldn’t those questions lead to a much more interesting, connecting conversation? It would take courage. It would take a willingness to see outside of your opinion, and accept that your mind might might be changed. Or that you will be thrown out of certainty into doubt. But how much could we gain from connecting rather than dividing?

What if instead of assuming there is only black (or blue) and white, we actively look for the grey?

Is there one topic that you feel strongly polarized about? What is it? 

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The Real Problem With Pink Legos

Pink Legos are controversial. Are they bad for girls, or good for them? Are they insulting and limiting, or a great invitation to STEM-related play? I have an opinion about the problem with pink Legos, and it might not be quite what you'd guess...

My daughter turned four at the beginning of February. She’s interested in building things, pretend play, super heroes, and animals. Between those interests and the twin gift-giving holidays of her birthday and Christmas, my partner and I have had a lot of conversations about pink Legos in the last couple of months.

We try to be a household with a wide expression of the gender continuum. Although he works in an office and I stay home to be with our daughter and prepare our food, we pretty evenly divide everything else. He wears his hair long and I wear mine short. We both use the power tools, we both work on the cars, we both know how to sew and how to draw. We encourage our daughter to try everything, climb everything, say what she means, express her feelings and follow her interests into whatever subjects she’s curious about.

So even though our daughter’s favorite color is purple, buying the box of Legos that came in pink and purple still gave me pause.

You can read the rest of this post on Bluegrass Redhead, where I’m filling in while Sarah is on maternity leave this week. I’d love to hear what you think about Legos for boys and girls!

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The Most Important Love Letters You’ve Never Written

I’ve been doing some work in my archives and finding great posts I wrote before this blog had many readers. This one, from 2013, is perfect for this week. Happy Valentine’s Day!

By mid-January, there were sparkling red hearts everywhere I turned, enjoining me to declare my love to my nearest and dearest. I try to make it a practice to make those declarations every day. Every morning I lift my daughter from her crib, kiss her nose and say, “Good morning, my love, how did you sleep?” I tell her I love her so many times each day that she just nods in response. Yes, she knows. Likewise, I kiss my man and tell him I love him every time we part, whether we will be separated for a few minutes or several hours.

But these hearts have had me thinking about the other things I should be giving some love but may instead be taking for granted. What could I create if I turned some loving energy on new parts in my life? What if, instead of writing a love letter to my lover, I wrote one to myself? What would I say? What if I expressed my love for something less tangible, like money, or pain?

I’m curious to try. Here are six ideas for love letters that I’m going to write this month.

To yourself

You, yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection. – Sharon Salzberg

It is so easy as mothers to turn all of our love, affection, and attention on others and forget to take care of ourselves.  How many times have I ushered Bean to the door bundled up and ready to go out on a cold day and then realize I’ve forgotten my own coat? I know that if I do not love and take care of my own self I know I will quickly run out of love and care to give.

A love letter to yourself can be as simple as a quiet moment, a long, deep breath, and a recitation of the traditional lovingkindness meditation phrases:

May I be filled with love.
May I be safe from danger.
May I be well.
May I be at ease.

To your family

A love letter to your family could be to the family you envision being – whether or not you are there yet. It could be a letter to your family of origin, either in gratitude for loving you and teaching you how to raise your own family, or in forgiveness for falling short of what you needed.

I am going to write a letter of gratitude for the family we are becoming together, a family I never could have imagined just a few years ago.

To your money

I’m part of a new year-long group led by Nona Jordan. Each month some of us choose a daily practice and support each other in keeping it and learning from whatever comes up around it.  This month several of us are writing daily love letters to our money. This is a simple but powerful exercise. Try it.

What is your relationship with money today? Is it loving? Playful? Cranky or hurt? How would you let your money know you love it and appreciate it?

To your body

My poor body. Always last on the list. Never quite enough time to exercise enough. All my meals interrupted by trying to entice a distractible toddler to eat, and rarely enough water or sun. And yet, my body carries me through each day, uncomplaining (well, a little complaint from my sciatic nerve lately). My body grew a whole new human! It is amazing, and I need to love it a whole lot more. This month my body’s love letter is going to be weekly yoga and more glasses of water. What can you do to show your body some love today?

To something that hurts

It feels counter-intuitive to offer love to something that is hurting you, but I have found so much healing in learning to turn toward hurt rather than clench away from it. In my yoga class, the instructor invites us each to set an intention for our practice each day. Today my intention was “love this hip that hurts.” Instead of feeling frustrated by poses that were painful because my back is tender, I leaned into stretches that loosened it up and modified the ones that were difficult until I could hold them with ease.

After an hour, my back hurt noticeably less. And my mood, without that nagging pain, was noticeably lighter. What is hurting in your life right now? Who is causing you pain? How can you offer that some love?

What love letters are you writing this month?

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Be Nice To Your Future Self

What can you do today be be nice to your future self? :: www.nuturedmama.net

I read about this idea, being nice to your future self, in a recent post by Heidi Swanton on 101 Cookbooks. She was talking about how making a big pot of soup so she’d have lunches to take with her to her studio is an act of kindness to her future self. What a brilliant way to think about taking time for self care, or organization, or preparedness, as a way to be nice to yourself in the future.

If I sit down with a cup of tea for 10 minutes before I go pick up my daughter from school, I’m being nice to my self two hours from now, when I would otherwise be grumpy with her.

If I choose to go to bed early tonight, I’m being nice to my tomorrow self.

If I sit down and make a menu plan on Sunday night, I’m being nice to my Monday morning self by having my shopping list ready before I go to the store, and my dinner hour self all week because I know what I’ll be cooking and I know I have all the ingredients.

If I plan a large meal on Monday, I’m being nice to my Tuesday and Wednesday selves when I can skip cooking and just reheat.

If I make time for my dreams, I’m being nice to my future self who will be able to see those dreams realized.

If I take a little time to rest, I will be a better parent, partner, and friend – and that’s nice to me and everyone around me.

What will you do today to be nice to your future self?

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